Lianne Spidel will be among those reading as part of Author’s Nights in Greenville, Ohio

As part of Author Nights in Greenville, Ohio, sponsored by Friends of the Library, Lianne Spidel will be one of six members of the Greenville Poets presenting a new program on Friday, April 25 at Montage Cafe, 527 S. Broadway in Greenville. The program, open and free to the public, will begin at 7 p.m. and includes music by the combo of Bill Westfall and J.R. Price. Others in the group are Cathryn Essinger, Myrna Stone, Belinda Rismiller, Suzanne Kelly-Garrison and David Garrison. Food and wine will be available for purchase.

Poems In Your Pocket—Antioch Writers’ Workshop Mini-Series Event

Grace Curtis author of The Shape of a Box, available soon from Dos Madres Press will be leading a writer’s workshop.

Sunday, April 13 at 2:00 PM to 3:30 PM, Books & Co, The Greene Shopping Center
4453 Walnut Street, Dayton, OH 45440, 937-429-2169

In celebrations of National Poetry Month, Grace Curtis will be leading a short program on writing and revising your work. Be ready to draft out and work on a poem. Notes on submitting poems to journals. Check out The Antioch Writer’s Workshop website for more great programs.

“Please Finish the Conversation” by Owen Lewis to be published in the Mississippi Review

“Please Finish the Conversation” from Owen Lewis’s book Sometimes Full Of Daylight was selected as a finalist for the Mississippi Review Prize, and will be published in the next issue.

PLEASE FINISH THE CONVERSATION

Welcome to the House of Uninvited Guests.
Want to try to get their attention? Get a word in?
I’m awake most of the time when they leave me

bored-to-death. Try to sleep, come evening
all at once they’re here. How many bells
did you hear? They’re crowding the kitchen

around the little pot of tea. Kettle keeps whistling,
open honey jar a buzzing hive of conversation.
They never finish what they’re saying. This house

gives me a headache. Again the wife who walked.
Who let her in? And Mother instructing the mayor
on how he’s supposed to remember Father.

I should have sat her down long ago, gotten
the whole story. How long could it take? Eight
hours? What’s eight, or three, or eleven? Nurse!

More numbers, green lines jumping the overhead
screen. Who ever gets the whole story, beginning
to end? Give them all the lie-detector test!

“Oh yes, and it’s so good to see you . . .